A scientific committee

Our president and a great number of our members are researchers with established credentials and are therefore competent to express an informed opinion on this subject.

Our president and a great number of our members are researchers with established credentials and are therefore competent to express an informed opinion on this subject. Hence Antidote Europe’s raison d’etre: firstly, to inform the public about the harm done to human health and the environment as a result of flawed research methods, and secondly, to promote genuine scientific research. Our committee is opposed to animal experimentation on strictly scientific grounds.

  • Dr Claude Reiss

    Dr Claude Reiss

    For more than thirty years, Claude Reiss held the position of research director at the CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) and also conducted research at the Jacques Monod Institute. In addition, he taught biology to doctoral students at the University of Lille. He has now retired from his positions in the public sector and is currently conducting his own research as a personal venture in the private sector.

  • Helene Sarraseca

    Helene Sarraseca

    Hélène Sarraseca is Antidote Europe’‘s administrative director and also co-founder. She is responsible for all correspondence with members, administrative duties, and editing the quarterly publication, “La Notice d’‘Antidote”.

  • Dr Andre Menache

    Dr Andre Menache

    CEO of Antidote Europe, André Ménache is a zoologist and a veterinary surgeon. He has a particular interest in medical law and was instrumental in amending the Declaration of Helsinki.

  • Dr Françoise Reiss

    Dr Françoise Reiss

    Françoise Reiss is emeritus research director at the CNRS and an internationally recognised figure in the field of bacterial photosynthesis.

The underlying pitfall lies in the fact that the results of animal experimenting can not be extrapolated to the human being, and neither can they be reliably extrapolated between different animal species. As a result, no amount of animal testing of a novel drug or therapy can realistically predict or reveal the toxic risk of the product with respect to human beings. Whilst thousands of chemicals currently in use have been passed as ‘safe’ on the basis of animal tests, many more thousands have not been assessed at all. It is now common knowledge that a substance considered harmless to some animal species may be highly toxic to others, as well as to humans.

Ultimately, we are just as much ‘guinea pigs’ as the laboratory animals. This sad state of affairs is confirmed by the enormous number of deaths associated with drugs and chemicals. Prescription drugs are one of the leading causes of death in industrialised nations today. An even more dramatic statistic is the exponential increase in deaths due to cancer, associated with exposure to carcinogenic chemicals in the environment – also found in blood samples of every European or North American inhabitant. To this toll must be added the increasing number of people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis), and problems associated with hormonal function, such as male infertility.